Site Main Controller & Site Incident Controller

Leaders with accountability for establishments designated under the Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 2015 (COMAH) clearly want to comply with the regulations and guidance; and have appropriate risk management in place to protect their business interests.

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Incident Management Team training

Leaders with accountability for establishments designated under the Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 2015 (COMAH) clearly want to comply with the regulations and guidance; and have appropriate risk management in place to protect their business interests.

For more information download the PDF

COMAH awareness for accountable executives

Leaders with accountability for establishments designated under the Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 2015 (COMAH) clearly want to comply with the regulations and guidance; and have appropriate risk management in place to protect their business interests.

For more information download the PDF

COMAH care teams and call centres

The Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 2015 (COMAH) require designated sites to plan for offsite emergencies. Operators are specifically required to inform and warn the public of the hazards they may face and the actions they should take. Together with duties under Health & Safety at Work Act (HSWA) 1974, operators face significant obligations to both internal and external populations.

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COMAH multi-agency exercises

The Control of Major Accident Hazards Regulations 2015 (COMAH) require designated sites to test offsite emergency plans periodically. In addition to complying with regulations, operators want to ensure appropriate response arrangements are in place to protect their business interests.

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Crisis maturity review

Leaders with accountability for risk management want to know the organisation has appropriate measures in place and, if not, that the organisation has a defensible position. In a recent study of 250 senior executives by Deloitte, 79% admitted to having faced a crisis event in the last year, yet only 56% consider their organisation to be prepared.

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Root cause analysis

Leaders with accountability for risk management want the organisation to learn from crises. They want to be able to demonstrate corrective action and implementation from that learning. Some organisations do not conduct meaningful reviews following a crisis or near miss. Some organisations conduct a superficial review. Some conduct a tick-box root cause analysis (RCA); but these tend to stop at operational causes. As a result, most organisations fail to identify the deep systemic causes.

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Crisis risk radar

Following a crisis, most organisations notice signals they could have detected, which might have warned them of an impact. Some risk management systems have an inherent weakness, however: they do not adequately deal with high-impact, low‑probability risks (those risks that have the potential to derail your business).

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Live crisis facilitation

In some cases, crisis impacts before the organisation has had a chance to build the crisis management capability they’d ideally like. In other cases, the organisation has good capability in place, but wants to enhance capacity to avoid being overwhelmed. Either way, in a live crisis, organisations need confident, competent facilitation of their crisis team. They need it fast. There is a lot at stake.

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Crisis simulations

Executives often get a false sense of security from having a so-called Crisis Plan on the shelf. Even if they rehearse the plan, this often just tells them how to get a team in the room or on a conference call. What does the crisis team actually do when it gets in the room? Without a common process, unhelpful behaviours will tend to dominate the team dynamic in a high-pressure situation. A lot is at stake.

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Crisis leader & facilitator training

More often than not, crisis leaders and facilitators lack real capability to manage a crisis. They are over-confident, under-confident, or just unaware of what is required. Many companies adopt a ‘hope-for-the-best’ attitude to crisis leadership and facilitation. If training happens at all, executives often find it comfortable, slow and predictable. They disengage.

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